Pānui ā Kura – 22 April 2016

Tū ki te marae, tū ki te ao, tihewa mauri ora. Tēna tātou e te whānau, tuatahi, me mihi ki tō tātou matua nui i te rangi, nāna nei ngā mea katoa. Tuarua, ki ngā mate hohua o te wā, haere. Haere ki pae maumahara, haere ki te kainga tūturu mō tāua te tangata. Mate atu he tete kura, ko rātou tēna i okioki ai. Ara ake he tete kura, ka hoki tēnei ki ngā kanohi ora, koutou rā e te whānau, tēna koutou.

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students promote Northland

Students Promote Northland and Maori Culture

A Whangarei charter school has brought its knowledge of Northland and Maori culture to a tourism project that will be seen around the world.

Students from Te Kapehu Whetu have teamed up with regional tourism and development body Northland Inc to produce a series of images of the region that will be used to attract international visitors to Northland.

Paul Davis, general manager of Northland Inc, said he approached Whangarei District Council about plans to organise a Maori culture-focused photo shoot to promote Northland and was referred to Rangatahi Inc – an initiative by charter school Te Kapehu Whetu which aims to unlock rangatahi entrepreneurship in Te Tai Tokerau.

“We gave them the brief and said this is about manaakitanga and the students should approach this from the perspective of: If international visitors were coming to your place, what would you show them and how would you go about that?” he said.

“We gave them the overall concept, they worked out how they would put it together, locations, who would be involved in what shots – it was an exercise they could do in their classes but it was also something for us which was very real and very needed.”

Te Kapehu Whetu students Maia Mokaraka, 15, and Te Rangi Munroe, 16, said they were not part of the group who made decisions on what the photo shoot would look like but were models for it with other classmates. Miss Mokaraka said she appreciated the need to ensure the photos were authentically Northland.

“They wanted an authentic feel to Aotearoa and to give people a glimpse of our way of living,” Miss Mokaraka said.

Miss Mokaraka and Mr Munroe travelled to different locations with photographer Sara Orme including the Waitangi Treaty Grounds, Paihia and Ruapekapeka Pa.

Miss Mokaraka said the photo shoot felt authentic and natural.

“We got to do things like make harakeke putiputi (flax flowers) with weavers, we didn’t have to try too hard,” Miss Mokaraka said.

Mr Davis said the students understood the brief right away.

“They were great, right from the start they knew what we were trying to do. They know Northland and parts of Northland really well,” he said

The images from the photo shoot will be used to promote Northland in visitor guides and the tourism trade directory and will be provided to international media and will be used in trade shows off shore and in New Zealand.


Originally featured in the Northern Advocate, Wednesday April 6, 2016
by Mikaela Collins

Photo: Maia Mokaraka, 15, and Te Rangi Munro, 16, helped promote Northland and Maori culture.  / Michael Cunningham


Important Dates for Term 1, 2016

Tēnā koutou e te whānau o te kura o Te Kāpehu Whetū.

Ngā mihi o te tau hou kia koutou.

Welcome to 2016. Already our school calendar is looking very full for the first term and we’re looking forward to receiving nga ākonga charged and ready to go.

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Baseball: Northland talent steps up in class

Several aspiring Northland baseballers are making their mark at national level, and a surge of youth interest in the sport could lead to more players joining them.

Aotea Parata, Tahu Tawhiwhirangi [Te Kāpehu Whetū students] and Xander King have continued soaring in the sport and, with the backing of Baseball Northland, will play for North Shore to further their progression.

Despite a lingering threat of losing them to other regions, Northland Baseball president Edward Irving is confident the boys will bring back what they have learned to Northland’s under-13 and secondary school representative teams.

“Our ultimate goal is to have strong under-15s and under-18s teams that we take to Auckland to play in their competition and, hopefully, take the title in two to three years.

“We have had two players get into the New Zealand Under-16 representative team and Aotea Parata made the cut to travel to South America,” he said.

“Our failure unfortunately is always funding and player depth … we will be pushing for a smart business owner to see value in potentially having three NZ rep players under their business brand in 2016.”

Irving said it was often hard to get players ahead of other sporting codes.

“I see this amazing depth from 12-16 years of age that would be great at baseball but they get grabbed by touch [rugby], but this season I will just need to get to them a bit quicker than Te Tai Tokerau Touch’s Joe Rau.”

Northland Baseball is looking to take the sport back to the schools, with a proposed intermediate and high school tournament to end with two trial teams selected to make a team of 12 players to travel to the New Zealand Nationals in April, 2016.

The season starts this week for all primary school age groups and then into intermediate schools in term four. To enquire with Northland Baseball, contact 021 189 0098.


Originally published in the Northern Advocate, November 4, 2015
Photo: Tahu Tawhiwhirangi (left) and Aotea Parata will play for North Shore. (Supplied)

Rangatahi Inc Launch Dinner

On August 28 this year, a bold new initiative called Rangatahi Inc was launched at Whangarei’s Toll Stadium. Rangatahi Inc is a collaborative initiative designed to unlock rangatahi entrepreneurship in Tai Tokerau. This video captures some of the highlights from the evening including the first product launch as a result of Rangatahi Inc – Inc Me, a high quality smart phone case with a QR code that contains a company or individual’s contact details.

Rangatahi Inc. Launch Event

Māori youth learn tricks of the trade

See video here. Originally presented on Te Kaea, by Dean Nathan

Developing the economic growth and success of Māori youth was the purpose of last night’s (August 29) business launch in Whāngarei. The project aims to focus on knowledge and opportunity gaps that hinder the progress of Māori youth.

Business leaders and politicians alike came together to support the launch of Rangatahi Inc.

Inspired youth Lewis Paul is passionate about the project ‘This amazing project will help me achieve my goals and aspirations to become a future leader.’

Ideally this initiative will help develop the resources needed to advance the Māori economy.

Charter teacher from Te Kāpehu Whetū Mr Nathan Mathew said he is proud of his youth’s presentation ‘It’s not an easy thing to get up before an audience of this calibre but tonight they did.’

Rangatahi Inc is a business centre for youth. Proceeds from the launch will go towards a trip to New York and Chicago in October. The 20 entrepreneurial youth chosen for the trip will be exposed to one of the world’s largest and most dynamic markets.

For Lewis Paul it’s all about ‘Experiencing the world and developing ourselves into Māori leaders of the future.’




Launch of Whakaruru Te Hau

On April 25 we received the waka tete, named ‘Whakaruru Te Hau’ by its creator Hekenukumai Busby.  The waka was launched immediately, crewed by Te Kāpehu Whetū akonga and pouako, to the glorious singing of our Paenuku babies and our Paerangi rangatahi.


Video kindly provided by Te Tai Tokerau Tarai Waka

Student’s training pays off

Dargaville’s Nico Te Whata, has placed first in his division in the Northland Secondary School Sports Association fitness competition.

The Te Kapehu Whetu school student’s mother says his “hard work and full time training schedule” has paid off, by coming first out of eight 15 and 16-year-olds in the junior varsity men’s division. There were about 45 competitors in the whole event.

The 15-year-old came second in the same competition last year and his trainer Ness Lawgun of Far North CrossFit says he is always keen to increase his strength and capabilities.

It was whilst boarding in Whangarei that Nico first attended CrossFit classes.

“He first came to us with the school just over a year ago and then started coming of his own accord. He is very enthusiastic and is a member of the Northland Olympic Weightlifting club as well.”

Nico trains six days a week, with two of those days dedicated to weightlifting. His mother Moana says his trainers see more of him than she does.

“I’m definitely proud. He has worked very hard and is very motivated.  It is a bit of an addiction. Nico has always been interested in sports and fitness and wants to try everything. He even busses into Whangarei during the school holidays to train.”


Originally published in the Kaipara Lifestyler, Tuesday May 19, 2015.  Written by Ayla Miller
Photo: Nico Te Whata with the medal he won during the Northland Secondary School Sports Association fitness competition


2015 academy badging

2015 Cadet badging ceremony

A special ceremony for youth known as the badging of new cadets into its Leadership Academy of A Company was held today in Whangarei.

Te Kāpehu Whetū Principal Dr Nathan Mathews says it’s a ceremony very similar to a military parade where cadets are presented to their whānau and are officially given the academy-pin to wear.

A haka was performed for those who passed away on the battlefield, and those who fought for the Māori Battalion.

Dr Nathan Mathews says, “That’s the best thing about having an academy, you get to acknowledge and commemorate those soldiers who fought in the world wars, for what, as an example for our young men today.”

It’s a celebration of these young men’s efforts, with the hope they will hold leadership roles in days to come.

“The ceremony is an introduction for new members into the Company A Academy, so the academy has been around for six years now but this year is the first time it will be in conjunction with Te Kāpehu Whetū,” says Mathew.

There are 110 students in this charter school and some hope they’ll be in the same shoes as their seniors soon.

Te Hurinui Retimana says, “I spoke to Staff Luke and he said it would be fine for me to join the academy next year.”

Te Ohomauri Henare has entered the academy for the first time, and today wears the medals of his great grandfather Sir James Henare.  It’s a very proud moment for the family.

Waimahana Henare says, “I’m so happy my brother has entered the academy because he’s a direct descendant of Sir James Henare.”

Tomorrow Te Kāpehu Whetū will be spending their Anzac Day launching their new waka tētē, a traditional waka Dr Mathews says will help towards understanding Māori traditions and celestial navigation.


See video here. Originally presented on Te Kaea by Heeni Brown 


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